Wildlife Refuge

ACE Basin National Wildlife Refuge

Published on February 9, 2015
ACE Basin National Wildlife Refuge
The ACE Basin National Wildlife Refuge helps protect the largest undeveloped estuary along the Atlantic Coast, with rich bottomland hardwoods and fresh and salt water marsh offering food and cover to a variety of wildlife.
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Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge

Published on February 9, 2015
Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge
The setting sun drapes the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in blood-red shadows as bending cattails and dry greasewood take on a beautiful glow. Your head feels light as you look to the east, Bennet Peak.
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Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

Published on February 9, 2015
Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge
Considered among the last remaining strongholds for black bear in eastern North Carolina and on the mid-Atlantic Coast, the Refuge also provides valuable habitat for concentrations of ducks, geese, and swans; wading birds, shorebirds, American woodcock, raptors, American alligators, white-tailed deer, raccoons, rabbits, quail, river otters, red-cockaded woodpeckers, and migrating songbirds.
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Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge

Published on February 9, 2015
Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge
The chorus of thousands of waterfowl. Wind moving through coastal prairie. The splash of an alligator going for a swim. A high-pitched call of a fulvous whistling duck. These are just some of the sounds you may hear when visiting the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge.
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Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge

Published on February 9, 2015
Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge
Ankeny Refuge was created to provide vital wintering habitat for Dusky Canada Geese. Unlike most other Canada geese, Duskies have limited summer and winter ranges.
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Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

Published on February 9, 2015
Aransas National Wildlife Refuge
This 70,504-acre refuge is made up of the Blackjack Peninsula, named for its scattered blackjack oaks, and three satellite units. Grasslands, live oaks, and redbay thickets cover deep, sandy soils.
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